The Dwarfs of Mount Atlas: Now Available!

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This is a nice little anthropological booklet that details the presumed existence of a tribe of abnormally small tribe of individuals living in some of the mountainous regions of the Atlas range in central Morocco. Funnily, it is technically possible such a group existed at the time, potentially having splintered off genetic pygmy groups in Central Africa. If such is the case, sadly, it is entirely likely the group succumbed to genocide or disease.

This tribe was apparently, if real at all, worshiped by some of the local inhabitants and was considered to have various magickal qualities including the imparting of good luck to locals when present. A fairly important bit of lore for those of us who are inclined to believe in the spiritual; things are not always entirely as they seem.

48 pages.

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The Divine Mystery: Now Available!

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This is an extremely interesting (and somewhat odd) little work that comes courtesy of the man who led the Rosicrucian FRC order (and fought with AMORC) for quite a large part of his life. Apparently interested in most sub-fields of occult lore, Clymer is known mostly for straight philosophical lore, but here has compiled three technical components into one work; a heavily altered variant of Sinistrari’s “Demoniality”, a short number of philosophical passages mentioning gnostic lore, and then a series of bits of actual dialogue between Jesus and the Virgin Mary on spiritual topics, which conforms to the FRC’s own ideology. Altogether the work is well worth reading, and its insinuation that the Virgin Mary was impregnated by a salamander, (a fire spirit) is perhaps heretical to main line christianity but interesting nonetheless.

104 pages.

Scottish Folklore: Now Available!

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This work is not, strictly speaking, occult in the main sense- however, folklore is often spiritual to an extent, and with this work, that is definitively the case. Written at the end of the 19th century, it contains anecdotal stories by the author- tales he heard or things he witnessed as a youth in Scotland. Some of the tales are hilarious, some bizarre, and a few touch on occult or cryptozoological topics such as the tendency of the old to tell spooky stories of kelpies and hags to small children (which the author- apparently a Reverend- deemed to be dismaying and bad for their spiritual development.) There’s one oddball tale here involving the local madman forcing a schoolboy to march around the town reciting a Bible story, at the hazard of a beating. The Christian nature of many of the stories (and the author) gives the work a decidedly pseudoreligious bent.

As I state in the foreword, some passages are in Scottish language- which is not fully the same as modern English (substantial numbers of terms are used that the average English or American reader would not understand.) For these passages I suggest sounding them out, and they can be more easily understood than simply reading them. Sometimes the context of the terms together makes the meaning clear. Altogether a good work, if a bit on the strange side.

170 pages.

Pagan Mythology: Now Available!

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This book is one of those happy titles that I enjoyed reading for its content in the informational and entertaining sense as much as for editing; it contains two pieces of content- pagan lore (Greek and Roman) first, and then a late 19th century analysis of the same in the sense of its connection to social and political topics- for example ideas such as tyranny, liberation, the way in which a royal court operates, and so forth. There are many examples given and the lore goes beyond the topical and is quite descriptive. The sections on Bacchus and Prometheus are particularly interesting.

79 pages.

Flower Lore: Now Available!

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This is one of the most comprehensive works I’ve edited- a near 200 page compilation of lore all related to the botanical, paired frequently with poetry and Shakespearean verse, with more than a few references to civics (at the time the idea of a national flower was apparently hotly debated- it does mention my own state, Vermont, choosing the red clover as state flower- which it still is!)

The number of references within mythology are impressive- especially Greek mythology and some of the Christian iconography of yesteryear- including of course perhaps the most famous with Saint Patrick and the four leafed clover. As an interesting aside there’s one little patch of white clover here on my property that spawns four leafed clutches at about a hundred times the normal rate (must be a mutant) and once I found one with seven in there. Altogether, this is a fine work, and right down my alley as a botanical enthusiast and lover of spiritual folklore.

190 pages.

A Tryal of Witches: Now Available!

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This little work is quite nice, and comprises two sections; a longer one that is a verbatim reprint of a 17th century witch trial, and second to that a short appendix with a few notations about the subject at large. I have decided to leave it in its original 19th century reprint form, with regards to the proceedings, which of course are in 17th century old English, archaic terms and all, because it is an important primary source document about persecution, and these days everyone should study more about moral panics and hysteria.

35 pages.

Werwolves; Various Folklore: Now Available!

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This is an excellent book, full length and in depth, produced by Elliott O’Donnell, a rather well known figure from the era- indeed, I just got done editing another of his works on spirits.

The lore here takes, mostly, the form of various folk tales from various cultures as far ranging as the Netherlands, France, and Siberia- some of them are quite entertaining short stories, and the author (who claims to have experienced several phenomena spoken of herein) mostly stands aside in general approval of the idea of lycanthropes while the stories tell themselves verbatim.

196 pages.