The Supernatural: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This is a frightfully short but very interesting work which, as with a few others I have edited, is primarily a speech (an oratory) meant to be delivered to an audience, as opposed to a booklet in and of itself. Penned by the well known Congregationalist Lyman Abbott. Here he expounds a bit on his evolving conception of his god and the presence of spiritual forces and states that he conceives of his deity as inter-penetrating all things while also refuting polytheism.

The title is slightly misleading since it is more about the form of divinity than the supernatural in a more general sense but it is still an interesting opinion piece.

28 pages.

Advertisements

Magic and Mystery: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This particular work is written from the perspective of sometimes quite severe skepticism towards folklore of various kinds, from the disorganized and tribal (and often antiquated) to the then-modern, medical, and “scientific.” Amusingly, some of its then-accepted scientific conjectures are now themselves classed as pseudoscience and hokum.

The span of subjects covered here is quite massive; of greatest interest are probably tidbits about fairy lore and homeopathy, which are fairly lengthy. Most of the text is broken up into very short segments of not much more than a paragraph or two on each subjugated subject.

138 pages.

Signs, Omens, and Superstitions: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This is one of my favorite editing works so far; a massive collection of folklore, dealing with every sign and omen under the sun from a dozen cultures, multiple epochs, etc. From bad luck to good, from relationships to employment, Cielo’s work has a little bit of everything. It is interesting to me that some of the content is familiar to me such as the common habit here in my own native New England of seeing barns with horse shoes nailed above the door, always open-end up to “keep in the luck.”

The author, a skeptic, wrote this work in order, ostensibly, to mock superstition, but instead is likely to be heralded as a compiler of folklore- the rational minds of the era sought to dispel supernatural things but ended up cataloguing them instead for future generations; a testament to the abilities of the paranormal, of the occult.

121 pages.

Letters From An Occult Student: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This is a fairly short work that is nonetheless interesting for two types of content; first, its fusion of apparently religious Christian material with Hinduism (often an element of theosophy although I could not find any information on the author being involved with the same) and second, its allusions to telegraphy, atoms, magnetism, and the like, in regards to the occult. These topics were widely popular in magical and philosophical movements until the roaring twenties came crashing down and more technologies were developed.

It contains multiple how-to passages actually teaching some occult practices, of whatever style or order the author belonged to.

60 pages.

Apparitions, Ghosts, Hobgoblins, and Haunted Houses: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

“Apparitions-” is a wonderful compilation of folklore that was actually written from the perspective of one who wished to expose spook stories as frauds and interesting bugbears. This is actually important; the work is then also a cautionary message for those who accept the spiritual, not to accept it all at face value but to utilize their reasoning abilities to determine if any particular tale is true. I do this for occult and cryptozoological topics myself; I accept for example the existence of extra terrestrial life but find very few sightings of flying saucers to have any legitimacy.

Some of these tales are actually hilarious also, such as a prank involving the use of phosphor to  create ghostly messages to frighten house guests or the time a man with a red rain cloak was mistaken for a specter, scaring an entire village in the process.

176 pages.

Celtic Mythology: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This particular book is a nice collection of linguistic lore and superstition related to the development of the Celtic people. Some of the content here is technically eugenic, proposing three separate ethnic groups with regards to the Celtic people.

It speaks of the divisions of Celtic culture (the bards, vates, and druids) and many other topics, and gives not just a broad introductory overview of the subject but delves into relatively advanced linguistic anthropology of a sort which most works ignore.

135 pages.

Strange Phenomena of New England: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This book is an excellent primer on the Salem Witch Trials- it contains mostly a slew of primary source documents; letters from the era, trial proceedings, and- at the end- the culminating document which ended the era for good, namely the recanting and apology of the jury involved for having condemned innocent people to death. While I have strong opinions on the subject of why the trials happened (my theory is a fusion of the ergot, property, and social panic theories and accepts none completely) I kept my own words to a minimum and relegated them to the foreword.

Some of the claims made especially during testimony are bizarre in the highest degree- flying objects strange creatures, demonic sexual intercourse, and what we would now deem both ghosts and psychic attack. Some of the stories told are chilling, especially when one considers that most of the accused were tortured and mistreated, even if only about a tenth of them ended up actually executed.

 

84 pages.