Fishes, Flowers, and Fire: Now Available!

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This is yet another of the infamous phallic works written during the late 1800s presumably by Hargrave Jennings, anonymously. The works at the time contained taboo materials, since they spoke of fertility rites, sexual symbolism, and feminine spiritual forces. While “Ophiolatreia” is perhaps the best known of the titles in this privately printed series, this one might be the most interesting.

The work contains three basic sections, as its title suggests; the use of fish as a sexual symbol especially as tired with Christianity would have been considered blasphemy in its era (even if accepted now)- flowers are a fairly obvious sex symbol, but the greatest bulk of the work regards fire worship. Here we see the interesting suggestion that those who “passed their seed (children) through fire to Molech” may have been not sacrificing them but rather ritualistically purifying them. An extremely good work.

115 pages.

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Mysteries of the Rosie Cross: Now Available!

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This work comes from a rather expansive (and otherwise mostly one-minded) collection of texts from the golden period of both real and quack-like academia involving occultism, from that special era in the 1890s; specifically, this is one of the better titles within the Phallism series that almost certainly was created by Hargrave at the time. Unlike most entries in that series, this one has nothing to do with symbology and everything to do with the Rosicrucians’ own then-translated purported literary history, with some alchemy and other subjects tossed in. The only other entry in the series that deviates from that one taboo subject of reproductive spiritual material is Ophiolatreia (which I edited quite some time ago.)

It’s quite good, actually, despite the fact that parts of it are a bit dense and difficult to fit into a linear sort of system; most of the content here was copied by the author verbatim into the work; some of that content is quite strange and fantastical, almost Atlantean. Nonetheless it is academically sound.

134 pages.