Poems of Paganism: Now Available!

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This little work is an interesting compilation of poetry (partially related to love, partially to nature) with a pagan twist- sometimes literally- included. The author crafted a number of poetic works in his era, and wrote this one under the pseudonym “paganus.”

It isn’t strictly pagan in the sense of epic poems about Valhalla, etc, much of it refers to cupid-style love and sometimes bereavement.

76 pages.

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The Religion of Ancient Scandinavia: Now Available!

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This little booklet is a rather obscure and interesting guide to a few basic concepts within Norse paganism from the semi-academic perspective. With a section on Thor and Odin and another on the rest of the major figures of Northern paganism, it includes a few strange asides about less well known subjects such as the “doom ring” (for human sacrifice) and the “Insult Post” which was a sort of magical totem designed to confuse or dismay land spirits in hopes that they would frown upon and actively hinder the plans and lives of those the post was dedicated to. It speaks a bit about the interplay between the Germanic and the Scandinavian traditions within a linguistic framework as well.

50 pages.

General Update: Phase Three of Editing, Re-editing Project, etc!

Alright literary world; time for an important update!

With “Mystic Will” released two days ago as of the time of this post, it is now time for a general cursory overview of what happens next; all of my works through the last were under spiritual contract of sorts and I not only met but exceeded my goal time-wise. This sets the stage for continual literary success; not a lot of people have catalogs of releases that extend to the size I have amassed and there’s nowhere to go but up.

The first goal after the 200th edition was to clean up my work files; I had four folders scattered across my computer and more on several USB drives with vestigial half-completed projects, source files I already edited from, and random images and notes I’d written. It took the last two days to clean them up. Now, that step is complete.

The second goal is to immediately complete a couple of the partially-done projects such as “Diabology” and possibly the “Asuri Kalpa” to knock them out of the way and be able to put those files at long last into the “completed works” storage.

The third goal is to really scrape my way through my usual sources for material to edit from and try to grab a few dozen more works of note. I culled my source files from about 1,000 to 54 in total, removing overly long works, poorly formatted works, and works I am uninterested in. I want to make sure to still release works fairly regularly but it won’t be nearly at the same rate as the last half a year or so.

The fourth goal is to get to re-editing a few of my releases, especially “Fruits of Eden” which I plan to have professionally re-illustrated, and will expand substantially, with a new foreword, one new section, and several dozen additional species entries now that I have so many herbal resources to draw from that I did not prior.

So it will be a busy half decade or so ahead. Cheers!

Celtic Mythology: Now Available!

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This particular book is a nice collection of linguistic lore and superstition related to the development of the Celtic people. Some of the content here is technically eugenic, proposing three separate ethnic groups with regards to the Celtic people.

It speaks of the divisions of Celtic culture (the bards, vates, and druids) and many other topics, and gives not just a broad introductory overview of the subject but delves into relatively advanced linguistic anthropology of a sort which most works ignore.

135 pages.

Pagan Mythology: Now Available!

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This book is one of those happy titles that I enjoyed reading for its content in the informational and entertaining sense as much as for editing; it contains two pieces of content- pagan lore (Greek and Roman) first, and then a late 19th century analysis of the same in the sense of its connection to social and political topics- for example ideas such as tyranny, liberation, the way in which a royal court operates, and so forth. There are many examples given and the lore goes beyond the topical and is quite descriptive. The sections on Bacchus and Prometheus are particularly interesting.

79 pages.

Flower Lore: Now Available!

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This is one of the most comprehensive works I’ve edited- a near 200 page compilation of lore all related to the botanical, paired frequently with poetry and Shakespearean verse, with more than a few references to civics (at the time the idea of a national flower was apparently hotly debated- it does mention my own state, Vermont, choosing the red clover as state flower- which it still is!)

The number of references within mythology are impressive- especially Greek mythology and some of the Christian iconography of yesteryear- including of course perhaps the most famous with Saint Patrick and the four leafed clover. As an interesting aside there’s one little patch of white clover here on my property that spawns four leafed clutches at about a hundred times the normal rate (must be a mutant) and once I found one with seven in there. Altogether, this is a fine work, and right down my alley as a botanical enthusiast and lover of spiritual folklore.

190 pages.

Realms of the Egyptian Dead: Now Available!

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This little work is one of the better, more dense pieces of Egyptology I’ve come across- one of the reasons I prioritized it in the new slew of works I have planned for the rest of 2018 into, probably, as late as mid 2020. Written by Alfred Wiedemann in the golden era of Victorian academic works, it is a broad overview of a few important topics within Egyptian pagan lore- especially focusing on the transition from live sacrifice to the use of clay figurines and similar things to lend a hand to the deceased, mummified Egyptian in the afterlife, as well as the topic of the self-contradicting nature of Egyptian lore; literally that within one burial two or more mythological tales scrawled on the tomb walls may tell stories which directly refute one another, causing legendary confusion.

It also contains a few bits about Egyptian mythology strictly related to Osiris and other deities, which is of decent import and quite interesting.

46 pages.