Echoes of the Orient: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

And now comes one of the most recognizable works released within Theosophy; an early work, “Echoes of the Orient” by the esteemed William Quan Judge.

Altogether it is a broad overview of 1. What Theosophy is, 2. What Theosophy believes, and 3. A mild refutation of some criticism aimed at the same. It should be noted that Judge was vice president of the rapidly expanding order at the time and that Theosophy would not only significantly expand after the writing of this book but spawn multiple significant offshoots, influencing politics despite being apolitical and being conjoined to the proro-eugenic movement.

70 pages.

Advertisements

Practical Occultism: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This is an excellent work delivered in the form of multiple lectures rather than as a single stand-alone book. It is at once an early example of pro-spiritualist literature and a brutal attack on then-mainstream religious sentiment regarding seances, ghosts, and other similar topics. Refuting the concept of Heaven and Hell in favor of spiritualist explanations, this book is one of a number of texts from the era which would lay the groundwork for the 1910s and 1920s explosion of occult societies that would recede only to give birth to the new age in the hippie era of flower children and apocalyptic atomic paranoia. Highly recommended for both practitioners and history buffs.

125 pages.

The Secret of the Success of the Ouija Board: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This short booklet is an exceptionally bizarre one in which a pair of women living in early 20th century Alaska utilized the then-modern Ouija Board and attempted to communicate with spirits, deriving two basic meanings: First, that the board works in part because of its occupation by what we would now call hidden folk (dwarves, elves,) and secondly that the Ouija Board is a “telegraph to God.” This reference shows its age- a decade later it might have been called a telephone. In any case, it’s definitely worth a read, and the rest of its technically folkloric content is, divorced of a Ouija Board, perhaps more authentic in manner.

27 pages.

Imperialistic Council of the Magi: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

Of all of the odd arcana I’ve encountered during half a decade editing occult works, this takes the cake for the most odd of all. Invoking none other than Eliphas Levi, it purports to tutor the reader in how to become a magi. Here I insert an opinion; this work is typical of the era (and for a couple decades after) and is more like the Book of Forbidden Knowledge than it is a standard occult philosophy guide, only without some of the bric-a-brac inclusions and advertisements for crystals and self help guides.

That isn’t to demean the work however- it’s a fun albeit short read, and the various teachings it employs aren’t inauthentic in and of themselves and roughly correlate to Theosophy and similar movements from the period. Highly recommended both for lore and laughs!

51 pages.

Animism, the Seed of Religion: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This is of interest potentially to two groups of people; the occultist will here find some interesting folk tales and spiritual rites from cultures then being actively studied at the height of the colonial era, and the history buff will find in these pages an interesting but sometimes outdated colonial perspective on non-European cultures. It focuses mostly on African lore but also on India and makes some mention (in the naturalistic period post-animism but prior to semimodern religion, as the theory then held) to the Mesoamericans. The categorical system isn’t entirely accurate, but it is applicable and useful.

60 pages.

Occultism in the Shakespeare Plays: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This quite short work is an excellent example of the type of Theosophical writing common in its era; a remarkably detailed study of some of Shakespeare’s plays and the occultism and references to omens, witches, and so forth present therein; it labels “The Tempest” as the most outwardly occult (which I happen to agree with) and also speaks about “Julius Caesar”, “Macbeth”, and a few other works. It should be noted that the Baconian tradition of Shakespeare was also studied within Theosophy and the topic of theater is of note within the occult because of its lycanthropic importance; the concept of illusion and deliberate misrepresentation of reality.

 

37 pages.

How to Hold Circles for Developing Mediumship At Home: Now Available!

CLICK TO PURCHASE

This short work is interesting for two reasons, neither of which has strictly to do with the stated main topic; it is all about how to develop the skill of mediumship, but the occultist has perhaps more use for it in its admonitions regarding self awareness and focus, and the literary buff will find it more of interest because it’s an exceptionally good example of the specific kind of mystic literature proliferating at the time, in the wake of the east-to-the-west expansion of spiritual consciousness.

43 pages.