Phallic Miscellanies: Now Available!

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This work is one of a number that comprised the phallic series, purportedly crafted by Hargrave Jennings anonymously to skirt censorship due to the taboo nature of the subject; it titillates the reader by rendering the solar, phallicist worship of the linga etc to degenerated status, then refusing to flesh out the more lurid parts of cultish ritual. Indeed the work isn’t inaccurate per se, it just fails sometimes to mention the scarcity of the phallic cult in the East, the left hand path of sex worship and indulgence.

It contains hundreds of quotes from secondary sources and from Hindu scriptures and delves a bit into Islamic and Buddhist lore as well, albeit less. It is important to note that Jennings (or whoever the author of this lengthy series was) believed that solar and phallic worship spawned all religion.

130 pages.

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The Laws of the Higher Life: Now Available!

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This short work is one of the many writings of the rather famous (or infamous!) Annie Besant; a Theosophist and one of the main figures thereof. This work lays out three particular laws (or sets of laws) governing a higher existence, ascendant and enlightened. They are, respectively, consciousness, duty, and sacrifice, and form a deeply Hinduism-tainted variant of Theosophy in part derived from her continuingly deep involvement in the Indian liberation movement. It alludes to and quotes the Bhagavad Gita and speaks at some length of aspects of Hindu mythology.

47 pages.

Letters From An Occult Student: Now Available!

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This is a fairly short work that is nonetheless interesting for two types of content; first, its fusion of apparently religious Christian material with Hinduism (often an element of theosophy although I could not find any information on the author being involved with the same) and second, its allusions to telegraphy, atoms, magnetism, and the like, in regards to the occult. These topics were widely popular in magical and philosophical movements until the roaring twenties came crashing down and more technologies were developed.

It contains multiple how-to passages actually teaching some occult practices, of whatever style or order the author belonged to.

60 pages.

The Ideals of Theosophy: Now Available!

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This work is quite a notable one, being written by Besant- one of the foremost theosophists of the movement, and once-adoptive mother of Krishnamurti himself. It contains a series of four lectures, two of which are basically about socio-political issues- these two are quite interesting because the criminal and societal reforms spoken of were indeed largely adopted by western nations after this era- for example not trying children as adults in the same legal framework for any but the most significant crimes, and preventative justice of several sorts.

While Besant was initially a political activist and socialist she later became interested more solely in spiritual matters; this work represents the step in between the two and shows her interest (waning as it was) in civic matters seeping into her religious philosophy. Works of this type helped to shape modernity in all its forms.

74 pages.

Animism, the Seed of Religion: Now Available!

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This is of interest potentially to two groups of people; the occultist will here find some interesting folk tales and spiritual rites from cultures then being actively studied at the height of the colonial era, and the history buff will find in these pages an interesting but sometimes outdated colonial perspective on non-European cultures. It focuses mostly on African lore but also on India and makes some mention (in the naturalistic period post-animism but prior to semimodern religion, as the theory then held) to the Mesoamericans. The categorical system isn’t entirely accurate, but it is applicable and useful.

60 pages.

Assamese Demonology: Now Available!

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This booklet is a detailed study of some of the spirits and demonic forces within the local lore of the Assam region of India- for the geographically uninclined, the region far to the East, near the borders of Bangladesh and Burma. The local lore is rife with strange creatures- some more malevolent than others, some more dangerous and some more easily pacified. It contains a laundry list of exorcism practices as well which involve often burning various substances. Altogether extremely interesting. It amusingly contains a list of noted exorcists by region that is obviously outdated (anyone having been an adult in 1906 there being “probably” dead.)

44 pages.

The Life After Death: Now Available!

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Yet another early work with no individual entry!

This tract is quite interesting and revolves- you guessed it- around the concept of the afterlife, that which happens after one is dead. To the theosophists a fusion of eastern and western lore is the answer; especially a sort of eastern-ized conceptualization of purgatory. Having expounded upon the form of the spirit world, Leadbeater also prescribes why Theosophists must help the departed and how.

56 pages.