Occultism For Beginners: Now Available!

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In what may be the most odd discovery I’ve made as I was updating files and re-editing and organizing, I suddenly remembered that for the first few works I ever edited there aren’t individual entries on my blogs since I had merely compiled them on one general update.

This particular work is one of the first I ever edited, now refined into a 5×8 format with a few typographical errors eliminated and a new cover. Here, Dower ruminates on biology, chemistry, and early radiological studies and formulates a sort of synchronistic worldview (As above, so below!) which coincides, he believes, with both eastern and western philosophy. Altogether it’s a fine work and one I recommend as a few must-read works on the subject.

64 pages.

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Fama Fraternitatis: Now Available!

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And here it is; one of the most important works I never originally thought to release an edition of- the famous Fama Fraternitatis, first worked into English by Thomas Vaughan, that selfsame work which inspired occult changes in its own era and long after.

Containing a great deal of content in only a few pages, for someone like myself the most interesting inclusions are those which overlap it with the type of occult of Trithemius and Pontanus among others- with everburning lights and strange mechanisms and symbology. The Fama Fraternitatis formed the backbone of what was represented as an order so wise in its era that members could prolong human longevity to centuries, make gold, cure any disease, and speak with spirits.

24 pages.

Concerning the Hermetic Art: Now Available!

 

This little text is more an academic study of alchemy than anything else; although it entitles itself after Hermeticism, the philosophical side of transformation is only half the content here; the other half details some primary sources of, and allusions to, physical alchemy, especially the composition of the green lion and the philosophic fire spoken of by Pontanus and others. It refers also to Flamel and Geber among others.

Altogether it’s a good work; a bit on the dense side, but with several very literal, straight-forward passages with regards to the physical alchemical component that seems of greater interest to most. Importantly, the work echoes (multiple times from multiple sources) that alchemy is veiled and hidden from the unwise, and that multiple traps have been laid for those seeking to simply turn things into gold and become wealthy.

52 pages.