Shaman Saiva and Sufi: Now Available!

 

Of all the academic works I have edited thus far this is one of the most interesting of all; it dates to that sweet-spot period of occult study between the 1880s and the 1920s which I favor. This particular work delves fairly deep into Malaysian magic but it isn’t just magic per se, in the sense of spells and such, but also religious ritualism, how it overlaps between, in the case of Malaysia, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, and other practice.

Perhaps most notable here is the inclusion of both cryptozoology and demonology along with folklore and superstition itself.

135 pages.

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Aryan Sun Myths: Now Available!

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This work is one of the best academic treatments of religious history that I have encountered. It spans a dozen cultures and many centuries in its pages, going from Babylon, Egypt, and ancient India, up through Greece, Rome, and into the then-modern period of the late 19th century.

Most of the lore here is in the form of historical quotation from Tacitus, Pliny, Caesar, and others, or else notations regarding the similarity between epic poems and literal mythology and the then-accepted trappings and symbols of Christendom. Indeed, the imagery of twelve followers (disciples), halos, resurrection, virgin birth, and many more such tropes, are originally pagan, and any actual historical Jesus is in all likelihood lost to history, because the subsequent writings on this figure were an amalgamation of a half dozen solar cults.

134 pages.

The Tree of Life, Physical Regenesis: Now Available!

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This work is the first of a number of quack medicine, herbal, and spiritualist works with pseudoscience that I intend to release this year; it’s one of the strangest, suggesting overlap between the twelve signs of the zodiac and twelve inorganic materials that are used by cells (thus proving in the mind of the author, a spiritually significant connection.) Much like Dowers’ explanation of “radium” and its importance spiritually, Carey likens the human being to a steam powered apparatus, with the pores as vents and other various miraculous similarities.

While thus hilarious at times, it also contains Careys’ apparent post-revelational vision of utopia and a good deal of spiritual commentary on avoiding alcohol, overeating, sexual contact, and other corrupting forces in order to inevitably lead mankind to a higher plane of existence in which labor is automated and humans live a peace loving existence in visible company with angels.

52 pages.