The Life After Death: Now Available!

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Yet another early work with no individual entry!

This tract is quite interesting and revolves- you guessed it- around the concept of the afterlife, that which happens after one is dead. To the theosophists a fusion of eastern and western lore is the answer; especially a sort of eastern-ized conceptualization of purgatory. Having expounded upon the form of the spirit world, Leadbeater also prescribes why Theosophists must help the departed and how.

56 pages.

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Shaman Saiva and Sufi: Now Available!

 

Of all the academic works I have edited thus far this is one of the most interesting of all; it dates to that sweet-spot period of occult study between the 1880s and the 1920s which I favor. This particular work delves fairly deep into Malaysian magic but it isn’t just magic per se, in the sense of spells and such, but also religious ritualism, how it overlaps between, in the case of Malaysia, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, and other practice.

Perhaps most notable here is the inclusion of both cryptozoology and demonology along with folklore and superstition itself.

135 pages.

Demonism Verified and Analyzed: Now Available!

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This work is an excellent look at some of the christian conceptions of demonology from its era, in the roaring twenties. Based on field work in China and India, mostly by the author but referencing other missionaries as well, it purports to prove that demons exist, that evil is the agency of Satan, and that mesmerism and psychology play a role in possession.

It contains several hundred of these anecdotes and speaks of strange idolatrous practices in typical early 20th century form, while listing polytheism and similar things as spiritually hazardous. Oddly, while proposing government moralism, it decries literal suppression of such beliefs in favor of mere coercion and education. It also attacks spiritualism.

140 pages.

Aryan Sun Myths: Now Available!

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This work is one of the best academic treatments of religious history that I have encountered. It spans a dozen cultures and many centuries in its pages, going from Babylon, Egypt, and ancient India, up through Greece, Rome, and into the then-modern period of the late 19th century.

Most of the lore here is in the form of historical quotation from Tacitus, Pliny, Caesar, and others, or else notations regarding the similarity between epic poems and literal mythology and the then-accepted trappings and symbols of Christendom. Indeed, the imagery of twelve followers (disciples), halos, resurrection, virgin birth, and many more such tropes, are originally pagan, and any actual historical Jesus is in all likelihood lost to history, because the subsequent writings on this figure were an amalgamation of a half dozen solar cults.

134 pages.