Scottish Folklore: Now Available!

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This work is not, strictly speaking, occult in the main sense- however, folklore is often spiritual to an extent, and with this work, that is definitively the case. Written at the end of the 19th century, it contains anecdotal stories by the author- tales he heard or things he witnessed as a youth in Scotland. Some of the tales are hilarious, some bizarre, and a few touch on occult or cryptozoological topics such as the tendency of the old to tell spooky stories of kelpies and hags to small children (which the author- apparently a Reverend- deemed to be dismaying and bad for their spiritual development.) There’s one oddball tale here involving the local madman forcing a schoolboy to march around the town reciting a Bible story, at the hazard of a beating. The Christian nature of many of the stories (and the author) gives the work a decidedly pseudoreligious bent.

As I state in the foreword, some passages are in Scottish language- which is not fully the same as modern English (substantial numbers of terms are used that the average English or American reader would not understand.) For these passages I suggest sounding them out, and they can be more easily understood than simply reading them. Sometimes the context of the terms together makes the meaning clear. Altogether a good work, if a bit on the strange side.

170 pages.

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Echoes of the Orient: Now Available!

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And now comes one of the most recognizable works released within Theosophy; an early work, “Echoes of the Orient” by the esteemed William Quan Judge.

Altogether it is a broad overview of 1. What Theosophy is, 2. What Theosophy believes, and 3. A mild refutation of some criticism aimed at the same. It should be noted that Judge was vice president of the rapidly expanding order at the time and that Theosophy would not only significantly expand after the writing of this book but spawn multiple significant offshoots, influencing politics despite being apolitical and being conjoined to the proro-eugenic movement.

70 pages.

The Family Nurse: Now Available!

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This excellent work is at once a manuscript of folk medicine, an apothecarian work, a recipe book, and a compilation of basic life tips from the 1830s; indeed, it is one of those “receipt books” from the era which, in domestic work, displaced some of the more odd content of the prior eras’ cosmopolitan grimoires. Gone is the alchemy in favor of more rational medicinal workings.

Containing a fairly lengthy herbal remedy section and recipes for ointments and salves as well, it’s surprising how much of the content is still utilized today- it humorously refers to the banes of both alcohol and opium while suggesting sometimes a little kick of gin should be added to a recipe or two, to solve for “patient discomfort.”

163 pages.

The Black Pullet: Now Available!

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This work never got its own entry either. Now in a proper format, this work primarily revolves around the usage of a series of magical talismans, as part of a larger story (Napoleonic in origin and era) in which the author has been saved by a Turkish mage from an angry group of Arabs. The author then is instructed in magic, including how to raise a hen which will create eggs made of gold.

The invocations and talismans are meant to be considered literal and the back story appears to have been used to justify the odd content. It should be noted that ascribing works to Napoleon, a Napoleonic soldier, or related things, was common for half a century thereafter due to his fascination with pre-anthropological ruin-diving.

82 pages.

The Esoteric Basis of Christianity: Now Available!

 

This short work is one of Kingslands’ additions to Theosophy; an interesting little booklet which compares Christendom with the claimed mystery religion at the core of Theosophy itself.

The words of Jesus in the canonical scriptures, as well as of Paul and others, here, are used to show that Jesus was not a believer in the kind of legalistic superstition of quasi-modern church dogma- indeed, not only is this inarguably factual, it has now recently emerged into other schools of completely legitimate philosophy.

44 pages.

Valhalla, Myths of Norseland: Now Available!

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I was looking around trying to find more works which involved paganism, especially Norse or Egyptian, to release over time, and some time ago I found about a dozen good works; this is one of them, just in time for that happy point in the year where the Fimbulwinter begins to decline away!

More a compilation than an authored work, its authors main contribution is its rather helpful index, as the preface she includes is a lengthy allusion to Christendom and the then-interesting facet of classical lore that people tended to ruminate on Rome and ignore the far north- a tendency now inverted today. It is a collection of twelve Norse tales, in poetic form, all the way up to Ragnarok and past it with the Regeneration. In this respect it is a standard collection, but an important one, especially for those who keep predicting Ragnarok literally and forgetting that it isn’t the end of history, just of a cycle.

110 pages.

Mysteries of the Rosie Cross: Now Available!

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This work comes from a rather expansive (and otherwise mostly one-minded) collection of texts from the golden period of both real and quack-like academia involving occultism, from that special era in the 1890s; specifically, this is one of the better titles within the Phallism series that almost certainly was created by Hargrave at the time. Unlike most entries in that series, this one has nothing to do with symbology and everything to do with the Rosicrucians’ own then-translated purported literary history, with some alchemy and other subjects tossed in. The only other entry in the series that deviates from that one taboo subject of reproductive spiritual material is Ophiolatreia (which I edited quite some time ago.)

It’s quite good, actually, despite the fact that parts of it are a bit dense and difficult to fit into a linear sort of system; most of the content here was copied by the author verbatim into the work; some of that content is quite strange and fantastical, almost Atlantean. Nonetheless it is academically sound.

134 pages.