Fishes, Flowers, and Fire: Now Available!

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This is yet another of the infamous phallic works written during the late 1800s presumably by Hargrave Jennings, anonymously. The works at the time contained taboo materials, since they spoke of fertility rites, sexual symbolism, and feminine spiritual forces. While “Ophiolatreia” is perhaps the best known of the titles in this privately printed series, this one might be the most interesting.

The work contains three basic sections, as its title suggests; the use of fish as a sexual symbol especially as tired with Christianity would have been considered blasphemy in its era (even if accepted now)- flowers are a fairly obvious sex symbol, but the greatest bulk of the work regards fire worship. Here we see the interesting suggestion that those who “passed their seed (children) through fire to Molech” may have been not sacrificing them but rather ritualistically purifying them. An extremely good work.

115 pages.

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The Black Pullet: Now Available!

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This work never got its own entry either. Now in a proper format, this work primarily revolves around the usage of a series of magical talismans, as part of a larger story (Napoleonic in origin and era) in which the author has been saved by a Turkish mage from an angry group of Arabs. The author then is instructed in magic, including how to raise a hen which will create eggs made of gold.

The invocations and talismans are meant to be considered literal and the back story appears to have been used to justify the odd content. It should be noted that ascribing works to Napoleon, a Napoleonic soldier, or related things, was common for half a century thereafter due to his fascination with pre-anthropological ruin-diving.

82 pages.

The Divining Rod: Now Available!

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This short but interesting manuscript is a compilation of lore related to the use of the divining rod (or dowsing rod) and was created by Latimer in the mid 1800s- Latimer proclaims his own skill with the use of the same and seems to take it fairly literally (minus the new age usage of the same- namely as a homeopathic medicinal object for closing “negative energies” off to heal the sick.)

The manufacture, use, and history of the dowsing rod is all spoken of here, both by the author himself as well as from sources he has compiled- a nice work on the subject, arguably one of the few in depth looks at the phenomena at all.

56 pages.