Folklore, Cryptozoology, and Mythology Books for Sale

The following is a continuously edited list of books about folklore, cryptids, and mythology which I have edited and released. All links are to Amazon, where I have self published my works.

THE BOOK OF WEREWOLVES
Click to Purchase
A fine work by Baring-Gould on lycanthropes, cannibalism, and berserkers. 

LORE OF THE UNICORN
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Shepard’s great work on the history, symbolism, and legend of the unicorn.

THE MAGIC OF THE HORSE SHOE
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An interesting folkloric look at the use of horse shoes, salt, and animals in superstition.

DRAGONS AND DRAGON LORE
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An extremely good look at Chinese, Hindu, and European dragon lore.

THE BOOK OF HALLOWEEN
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A good compilation of history and folklore related to Halloween and its prior counterparts.

MAGIC OF THE MIDDLE AGES
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A good look at the witch trials, cryptids, and ritual magick by Rydberg.

Short Update Re: Ebooks

It’s time for a short announcement for several important pieces of information for my readers here.

1. I have transferred the files and information for the last 20ish works I have released to kdp. Soon they will be available on kindle as ebooks. I tend to drag my heels for months at a time on such things (because I myself do not like ebooks and tablets, I want physical copies of literary works) and then do them in spurts like this. This includes works like “The Piasa”, “The Roman Index of Forbidden Books”, and “Is the Devil a Myth?” among others.

2. Soon I will add links for both paperback and ebook copies to the category lists. For a few titles there will be no ebook because kindle’s platform has slightly different terms of service from Createspace for paperback works.

3. I have obtained a dozen new works to work on; some titles on alchemy, a few psychic works, and some mesmerism and other pseudoscience.

4. The tenth category will soon be added; “Folklore, Mythology, and Cryptozoology.” A new “Mysticism and Spirituality” category will absorb some works from other categories and replace the folk magic category.

General Update For July

As of right now I am juggling several good projects; Puckle’s “Funeral Customs” is first on the list, rapidly approaching completion, and will be available probably within a week, indeed possibly two or three more days if I continue editing at the rate I have been for some time.

I have obtained several new works that fit within the herbal and homeopathic category; I still have the South Sea Herbal to work on as well, so that makes three more entries within that category for the fairly near future; one is a longer work, the South Sea Herbal is rather short, and another that is about 60 pages in length, a simple hand guide to some herbal species.

The tenth category to be added to this blog (specifically for cryptids and folklore) will be made subsequent to the next title being finished that will fit into the same category. I may eliminate the folk magic category and create a new one specifically for mysticism which requires shuffling a few titles around as well- into that category will go works like the Sepher Bahir, along with a few works currently in the Divination category which are more spiritual as opposed to some of the routine fortune-telling titles.

Over the coming months I hope to return to works of divination and, once the South Sea Herbal is illustrated and released, it will finally be time to unleash a stand-alone variant of the Ars Goetia on the world and, after that, a version of the Lesser Keys of Solomon; the most famous of all grimoires.

Dragons and Dragon Lore: Now Available!

This is one of the better and more complete works made on the subject of dragons through over a century of time; Ingersoll’s work covers so many cultures that it would be fruitless to list them all, but the inclusion of the Hindu nagas and their lore is certainly worth mention.

As far as academic occultism goes this book is good; as far as cryptozoological primary sources go it’s even better.

166 pages.

Magic of the Horse Shoe: Now Available!

This is one of the greater compilations of folklore I have encountered; written by Robert Means Lawrence, it compiles an extremely long and detailed bit of information related to the symbolism and use of horse shoes in the context of good luck and superstition, along with elaborate side topics like the similar superstitious use of salt, or of animals.

Not content to study one culture or time period, Lawrence helpfully decided to span several thousand years of human history in this text, and ruminated on the similarity and overlap between such traditions in dozens of cultures both extinct and then-modern. Those interested in the history of witchcraft, or of certain cryptozoological aspects, will also find a great deal of compiled material here.

252 pages.

Lore of the Unicorn: Now Available!

This work is pure rationalism circa the early 20th century. Penned by Odell Shepard, it goes to great lengths in being as detailed as possible, not limiting itself by time period or region. Speaking of lore as separate as that of Africa and India, the tale of the unicorn (or alicorn) is rendered not simply to a misunderstood and real beast here, but takes on a wider symbology and meaning.

The most interesting component of Shepard’s work here though is medicinal and related to medieval folklore; the unicorn horn (variously the horn of a rhinoceros or narwhal, and sometimes that of an antelope or even a chunk of petrified wood) was rumored in those days to sweat in the presence of any poison and to act as a souped-up sort of bezoar taken internally. The content is at times dense, and it draws on many primary sources both antiquated and then-modern.

216 pages.

General Update Time!

I have completed the editing of “Lore of the Unicorn” and it will be available today and of course posted about here. This is just the first of several more folklore-and-cryptid style works I wish to release in a fairly short span of time. Those two herbals have not been forgotten; I think I’ll bend to pressure and pay someone a flat fee and put their name on the works in exchange for not having to draw up the illustrations there personally; it means it might take a year or so for the works to pay themselves off (they’re not top tier works, popularity-wise) but it’s worth it to have them done and to expand the herbal category.

Which brings me to the goal of creating a new category sometime this summer for a new style of work which doesn’t currently fit in any other category; folklore and cryptozoology. This will likely be the last category created for this year, although I could plow away at some works on ghosts and psychic lore and craft that one as well. I haven’t decided yet!

Good times ahead!