An Explanation of the Natural Philosophers’ Tincture: Now Available!

This manuscript concerns the chemical components of alchemy more than the actual crafting of any sorcerers’ stone or elixir itself; indeed, it is the general recipe for the precursor materials needed to work the great work itself. The formula is fairly explicit but most of the secondary content used to “prove” the point is religious in nature and heavily metaphorical. Overall, a fine alchemical work of note, from one of the less well known figures within the period. It is slightly similar to some of Hollandus’ work.

37 pages.

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Freher’s Process: Now Available!

Within the realm of alchemy a heavy amount of metaphor is typically used, but Freher’s short tract here is exceptional perhaps for its willingness to state that the spiritual, here, and the chemical are deliberately overlapped- that isn’t to say it’s as transparent as glass; the text specifically (at the end, obviously!) says there is more that could be said, omitted because it’s superfluous- a common cliff-hanger style in literature dealing with alchemy.

Though short, this work has as much detail on the rudimentary process of refining base materials into the stone of the philosophers (elixir)- here more a spiritual matter than physical, as the Rosarium Philosophorum.

36 pages.

Six Keys of Eudoxus: Now Available!

This alchemical manuscript is rather short, and alludes to Pontanus, Flamel, Hermes, and others, while proposing a six-step sort of system in which the philosophers’ stone is made and used for various purposes.

It is vaguely a shortened adaptation of the Rosarium Philosophorum; making use of the general metaphor of the age- coagulating, fermenting, distilling, and other processes are overlapped with spiritual, often cosmic imagery.

24 pages.

The Tomb of Semiramis: Now Available!

Talk about an early Yule gift; Createspace saw fit to finally accept and process this submission two months later; I have to assume whoever had it on hold quit their job or there was a glitch in the system.

This short work is alchemical in nature; it appears to adapt and retell “A Work of Saturn” by Hollandus and describes the crafting and augmenting of the philosophers’ stone to create elixir- a sort of metallic substance that melts like wax at low heat (or in contact with silver) and can be dissolved in wine or injected into wounds- that this substance is a sort of mercurial compound renders it perhaps less favorable in modern medicine, although I suppose it could destroy infections.

26 pages.

Golden Tractate of Hermes: Now Available!

The Golden Tractate of Hermes is one of the shorter variety of alchemical works ever made, but that doesn’t make it worth a read; along with Pontanus’ and Artephius’ works (with allusions infrequently in other materials) it seeks to explain alchemy without all of the symbolism and veils most prevalent therein- a task it performs with some degree of success.

Not actually written by Trismegistus but in the Renaissance, the content here is as much to illuminate other works as to explain its own Ixir-crafting process.

24 pages.

The Secret Work of the Hermetic Philosophy: Now Available!

While this specific work claims the title of Hermetic Philosophy, it is more a standard alchemical text than a philosophical tract.

It attempts to reduce the convolution and deliberate obfuscation of alchemical truth by prior authors to a lesser degree such that the student is more readily able to understand the process of creating the stone of the philosophers- an attempt which is partially successful. It then divides the total work into the Zodiac, referencing stages of time required to produce the final result by astrological means.

52 pages.

On the Philadelphian Gold: Now Available!

“On the Philadelphian Gold” is mostly a Socratic-style dialogue related to philosophy as opposed to alchemy, but it is an alchemical work nonetheless, insofar asĀ  it relates to the several types of matter and body posited to exist by one member of this same dialogue; Philadelphus, speaking with the materialistic Philochrysis on the topic of spiritual gold.

This work was made by the Philadelphian Society many centuries ago. This edition has been rendered from older English usage to mostly modern English, save for a few references which have no other proper counterpart.

38 pages.